The end of the (written) word as we know it?

As someone who prefers writing over speaking any day of the week, one Rosemary O’Connor quote has always resonated with me:

 

“I write because I don’t know what I think until I read what I say.”

 

If you feel the same way, then you may have a similar reaction to Facebook’s prediction that, in five years’ time, the written word will be out—at least when it comes to social media—and video will become the communication method of choice.

 

According to the social media giant, the number of text updates has already started to diminish, while video is on the rise. As someone who gets clunky in front of a camera—who trips over her words, can’t remember what she wanted to say, and says “like”, “um” and “uh” an embarrassingly inordinate amount of times in one sentence—I can’t imagine a day when I’d ever turn a camera on myself to announce a mundane update in my life.

 

That said, I understand the whole notion of “show, don’t tell”—and while it may be difficult to capture many of life’s personal, spontaneous moments on camera, I definitely see how businesses could start relying more on video when it comes to social media marketing.

 

What do you think? Could the written word eventually become extinct? What would that type of world even LOOK like?

Get out of your social media comfort zone

If we said any social media channel could work for your brand, would you believe us?

The ‘no more excuses’ social media plan

Social media is a phenomenal way to connect with customers—but a consistent, effective strategy can also be a drag to maintain. In an ideal world, you’ll have someone to manage the day-to-day tasks for you. But if you don’t, you’ll be happy to hear you can do it yourself—in just 18 minutes a day. Hootesuite recently set out a great 18-minute social media plan for businesses. Basically, the minute-by-minute guide breaks down the social media experience into five easy steps: browse and engage; monitor; post; analyze; and schedule. It also gives you advice about how to apply the five steps to the various social media channels. In our opinion, it’s […]

Tweets, Facebook Posts and Headlines – Is There an Ideal Length?

According to a recent article in Fast Company Magazine, there are , in fact, optimal lengths for our various missives on social media networks.  The article also provide some backup research.

Here are the highlights:

•    Perfect tweet length was right around 100 characters, resulting in a spike of re-tweets
•    Facebook posts of 40 characters or less receive 86% higher engagement
•    Six word headlines increase the chances that the entire headline will be read (Yes, the research showed that our attention spans have decreased to the point where we not only scan the body of an article or post but the headline as well).

For more fun facts, read the full article here.  Once you do, let me if your own experience backs the research up and how you are addressing it in your own marketing campaigns.

So you think Facebook is no good for B2B service companies? Think Again!

There seems to be a perception that Facebook may be good for big B2C brands, but not of much use to B2B marketers, especially those in the services industry.  As a recent article in the Social Media Examiner aptly put it, in the context of a legendary mission to the moon: 

“The story of Apollo 13 astronauts trying desperately to get back to Earth after a failed mission has a lesson for B2B marketers.  Astronauts used the moon’s gravitational pull to slingshot them so they had enough power left to get back to Earth.

“B2B marketers: Facebook is your moon.

“In the 2012 Social Media Marketing Industry Report, B2B marketers reported that they were far more likely to increase their use of LinkedIn and blogging than Facebook in the coming year.

“But while Facebook may not be your final destination for marketing to B2B customers, it has incredible gravitational pull. Savvy marketers, like the astronauts aboard the Apollo 13 mission, can leverage that pull to take them where they want to go.”

The article proceeds to detail the fascinating story of how some executive firms went about using Facebook to build a brand “in a crowded field in an industry that frankly isn’t very sexy”.   Click here to read the full article